I am obsessed with audiobooks and podcasts. Every free moment I get - commuting, running, swimming(!) - I’m listening. I’m always looking for recommendations. Come at me with science, technology, history, philosophy and society. Or, better, something that makes me uncomfortable.

Our political dialogue is mired by an obsession with job creation. We need a new narrative. I’m trying to help our industry tell our story better.

I’m fascinated by technology applied to health. How can it be that even today I go to the GP and they ask a few questions, take some measurements and then make a diagnosis? No data? No baseline? One person’s memory rather than an up-to-date database? Craziness. I want to meet more entrepreneurs whose work will improve our lives.

I’m a games-aholic. But sadly, I’m not great at any of them. If you’re into chess, ocean swimming, squash, cycling, go, tennis, touch footy, golf, running or mixed netball … I’m up for a game.

At AirTree, we back founders for their strengths, not for their lack of weaknesses. I want to learn why you’ll win, not why you won’t lose.

One of our investors in Summly was Stephen Fry. He was always the most interesting person in the room on any topic. It was astonishing. When I grow up I want to be like Stephen.

I’m inspired by those who struggle and grind it out trying to find product market fit when they could easily be earning big money at Google. I want to work with those founders.

Your VC is the one employee you can’t fire. Take the time to get to know them well in advance of taking an investment. The average venture investment lasts longer than the average marriage. Go on a few dates first!

People underestimate the pressure founders feel. Not only is their reputation and often their sense of self-worth tied up in their company, they are also responsible for the livelihoods of their team. That can be dozens or hundreds of people. And their families.

Recruiting is really hard. I try to help founders by showing them what “great” looks like. If you know what you’re looking for, you make better hires.

I am obsessed with audiobooks and podcasts. Every free moment I get - commuting, running, swimming(!) - I’m listening. I’m always looking for recommendations. Come at me with science, technology, history, philosophy and society. Or, better, something that makes me uncomfortable.

Our political dialogue is mired by an obsession with job creation. We need a new narrative. I’m trying to help our industry tell our story better.

I’m fascinated by technology applied to health. How can it be that even today I go to the GP and they ask a few questions, take some measurements and then make a diagnosis? No data? No baseline? One person’s memory rather than an up-to-date database? Craziness. I want to meet more entrepreneurs whose work will improve our lives.

I’m a games-aholic. But sadly, I’m not great at any of them. If you’re into chess, ocean swimming, squash, cycling, go, tennis, touch footy, golf, running or mixed netball … I’m up for a game.

At AirTree, we back founders for their strengths, not for their lack of weaknesses. I want to learn why you’ll win, not why you won’t lose.

One of our investors in Summly was Stephen Fry. He was always the most interesting person in the room on any topic. It was astonishing. When I grow up I want to be like Stephen.

I’m inspired by those who struggle and grind it out trying to find product market fit when they could easily be earning big money at Google. I want to work with those founders.

Your VC is the one employee you can’t fire. Take the time to get to know them well in advance of taking an investment. The average venture investment lasts longer than the average marriage. Go on a few dates first!

People underestimate the pressure founders feel. Not only is their reputation and often their sense of self-worth tied up in their company, they are also responsible for the livelihoods of their team. That can be dozens or hundreds of people. And their families.

Recruiting is really hard. I try to help founders by showing them what “great” looks like. If you know what you’re looking for, you make better hires.